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Size DOES matter!

 

Selya's Miniature Page

 

 

 

Most Recent Mini!

 

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Hi and welcome!

If you've started looking around already, you will surely have noticed that this is no Godzilla fan site and that there aren't any nekkid guys and girls either (although there will definitely be some in the future... but they will be tiny - and PEWTER!)


This site is actually about miniatures... toy soldiers, that is.
If you know everything about them already, don't read further; I have nothing to teach you.

If, on the other hand, you're still wondering "What the...?", well...

Miniatures can be either metal or plastic/resin and come in different sizes, or "scales".


People buy them for different reasons: some play wargames with them or use them to represent their characters in RPGs; some others simply buy the ones they like just for the heck of it, and collect them; some others enjoy painting them to an astonishingly high standard - and some others, like yours truly, keep promising themselves that they will, indeed, paint them really well someday, and in the meantime buy compulsively more. LOL!

I still dream of portraying every single PC of every RPG I've played... yet, alas, characters enter - and sometimes, sadly enough, depart - their respective worlds much faster than I can paint them.


But I digress... let's get back to our little lesson.


The smallest miniatures can be as tiny as 6 mm, although nowadays theyre usually around 10-15 mm. Most of these are historical in nature; that's because they're used by wargamers to re-enact and fight actual historical battles (es. Waterloo and such). Since those battles involved many thousands of soldiers, the minis need to be very small, otherwise players would need a gaming table as wide as a tennis field to line them up... logical, uh?

I greatly admire people who can paint 15 mm stuff and make it look beautiful despite the tiny size, yet I favour working on larger scales myself.


"Heroic" 25 mm is the scale employed by most producers of fantasy/sci-fi minis, such as Games Workshop. They're actually bigger than what the name would let you suppose - they're usually 28 mm high and sometimes even close to 32-35 mm.

This is my favourite scale to paint: big enough that you can put some detail on the fig, yet not so much as to become a blending nightmare!


54mm is, again, a scale favoured by historical aficionados; since they're relatively big, they're not used in games (except "skirmish" ones involving only a few characters for each player, such as GW's Inquisitor): people just paint them to look nice and keep them for display.

I have a couple of these myself... someday I'll work up the courage to try painting them!


Bigger figures can't be classified as "miniatures" any more; they're rather "models" - again, either metal or plastic (resin or vinyl) and ranging from historical to fantasy/sci-fi, horror, manga, and erotica.


Now you know everything there is to know about miniatures, so to hell with theory and enjoy the real thing!


And please, be back soon...

 

 

Spotlight on...

 

December 12th, 2005

Werner Klockes new LE mini, the first of the Three Queens, is now available atFreebooter Miniatures.

Be quick to buy your own... she only comes in 1000 copies!

 

Check the Events page for more!

 

 

 

 

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